Photography

Photography

I’ve always loved Photography, but never actually learned or mastered the techniques. This lack of knowledge led me to do an online course on Udemy about it, and I will now share the main things I’ve learned there.


Shot Composition Types

  • Perspective
  • Vantage Point
  • Rule of Thirds
  • Dead Space

1. Perspective

Low Angle

The lower that you shoot, the bigger your subject looks.

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High Angle

High angle can make your subject appear smaller and increase the depth of an image.

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Lateral Movement

This is basically moving left to right and shooting the subject from the left, center or right and choose the angle you think looks the best.

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1st Person POV

This shows the photographer’s point of view, usually showing a leg or an arm. This places the viewer in the eye of the photographer.

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2. Composition

Vantage Point: Point of focus created by leading lines. There are two different types of leading lines: geometric and organic.

Geometric

These lines are often found in streets and buildings. They are straight and obvious to follow.

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Organic

These lines are often found in nature like mountains, trees, rivers, etc. They tend to bend and curve more, but always lead to a specific area.

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3. Rule of Thirds

This is the act of separating your frame into 9 parts with 3 columns (grid). You can place the subject on the first or last column to draw attention to the composition as a whole rather than a single point. It includes the background as a second subject and gives a wider picture of what the main subject is looking at.

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4. Dead Space

Dead space is considered any space behind a subject without any distracting elements. It is used to highlight a single subject with nothing more than a wide open area: with backgrounds that are far away, empty, and/ or have just one tone of colour.

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Filling the frame

This is just a style choice, but sometimes it looks nice to add some elements to eliminate dead space with objects in the surrondings.

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Macro Photography

Macro photoghaphy means shooting extremely close up, commonely done on insects and plants.

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Bullet Journal

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 Thinking of starting a bullet journal? You’ve come to the right place! Here you’ll learn what a bullet journal is, why you need one and some cool ideas to be creative and adjust your bullet journal to your needs!

 

What is a bullet journal?

Thanks to Instagram — and mounting stress levels — millions of people have ditched their basic planners for a bullet journal and consider this method the best way to plan, reflect, and meditate. And while for some people this is just a journal full of confusing symbols and shorthand, it’s actually a mindfulness practice disguised as a productivity system.

Equal parts day planner, diary, and written meditation, bullet journaling turns the chaos of coordinating your life into a streamlined system that helps you be more productive and reach your personal and professional goals. With sections to log your daily to-do’s, monthly calendar, notes, long-term wants and more, your bullet journal is customized to your life and your needs.

By updating it daily, you learn how to get rid of things that are distracting you and add things you care about. But it’s really built with you in mind: the only thing that the bullet journal needs to be is effective, and how it can best serve its author is entirely up to them. Customize your bullet journal by selecting symbols that are easy for you to understand and creating sections (called “collections”) that align with your long and short-term goals such as a fertility tracker, fitness log, diary, and more.

And for everyone who’s panicking about their art skills, a bullet journal is always about function over form. And to be very clear about that, form can mean sloppy or beautiful. It doesn’t matter what your bullet journal looks like. It’s about how it makes you feel, and how effective it is in moving you towards the things that matter to you.

That’s where the mindfulness connection comes in. Unlike traditional organizers and planners, this method encourages authors to examine how their goals, tasks, and responsibilities make them feel. Instead of a standard checklist, bullet journaling requires daily, monthly, and yearly reflections along with bullet points and asterisks galore.

 

A bullet journal is good for…

  • People who have a million little to-do lists floating around
  • People who like pen and paper to-do lists
  • People who are into goal-setting and habit tracking
  • People who like stationery, journaling, scrapbooking, beautiful pens, etc.
  • People who really love planners
  • People who want to really love planners, or who want to be more organized
  • People who would really like to keep a journal/diary but are having trouble sticking with the habit

 

What tools do I need?

  • An A5 dotted notebook
  • Pen (Micron fineliners)
  • Fine point markets
  • Calendar stickers
  • Washi tape sets
  • Stencil sets

 

How do I start bullet journaling?

Ask yourself: what do you want the bullet journal to do for you? Once you have a general idea, build a system that suits your needs and art skills. If you’re overwhelmed about the flexible format, start with a monthly log where you can prioritize responsibilities to meet monthly goals. From there, flesh it out with a daily log.

Index:

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This section is at the front of your notebook and serves as a table of contents with page numbers to different collections and a symbol key that you update as you go.

Future Log:

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This four-page spread is a year-at-a-glance calendar with future events, goals, and long-term tasks. Add birthdays, travel plans, and major holidays.

Monthly Log:

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This two-page spread includes a calendar with a bird’s-eye view of the month and a task page with things you want to tackle during the month. You can also add other monthly tracking pages (“modules”) including a food, fitness, finance, or book log.

Many bullet journalers have at least two pages devoted to the big-picture view of each month: a monthly calendar page, and a monthly tasks page:

Calendar Page: Use this to write down your events and/or add a note of what happened. The calendar is laid out this way to give you enough space to write a short snippet of events you may have going on and also to note anything you may wish to remember. This will allow you to get a snapshot of what happened.

Task Page: This list consists of tasks you want to get done this month and tasks from last month that you migrated.

Daily Log:

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This is your day-to-day to-do list.

 

Which other collections can  I create?

Collections are a group of related ideas. Every single page in the Bullet Journal is by definition considered a collection. This includes the monthly log, daily log, future log, and any page you give a topic to. You can make a list of anything! Here are some suggestions.

 

List of things you like:

It can be, for example, a list of songs you like. If you recall, in the Daily Log there are these songs with a Note Bullet, that were then migrated to a Collection to keep them in one place, as per the Bullet Journal guidelines when you find yourself writing down the same kind of idea over and again in your Daily Logs.

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Gratitude Log:

Collections can be logs of some kind. Here is a gratitude log to write down 3 things you are thankful for each night, seeing them all in one place makes my heart happy.

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Log & Tracker:

Another idea for a collection can be a log & tracker – to write down, for example, notes about how you feel after your daily run.

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Goal Plans:

Goal plans are fun to create with a bullet journal. You can write about your plan, including your motivation, S.M.A.R.T. game plan, and color-code it to connect the ideas on how you would follow-through.

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Tracker:

You can also create a tracker as a system to help you reach your goals and complement your plan. A tracker is the perfect thing to help you reach your aims! Here’s a week-by-week tracker related to the goal plan from the last photo.

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Sketches:

Sometimes you just want to turn the page and sketch. Simply make an entry in your index called, “Sketches: 22, 45-49,…” and add to it to keep track of your collections that span across several pages.

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There are many, many other forms and types of collections I’m sure you could come up with! It’s a notebook, first and foremost, and the blank page is a canvas to create anything you wish!

 

Bullets and Signifiers in Bullet Journaling

While you should create a key that fits your needs, you can use the following symbols as an example to create consistency:

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Of course you can choose to create your own Bullets and Signifiers as you see fit. It’s your call!

Putting the pieces together

  • When you create a collection, you add it to the index;

  • You use bullets & signifiers to the left of the bullet points as needed;

  • You migrate tasks between collections as needed on a monthly basis. At the end of the month, look over through all of your collections (this includes the monthly and daily logs) to assess whether they are worth doing. If they are worth doing, Migrate them to the new Monthly Log. If they are not worth doing then cross them out, remove the noise. If they are worth doing, but at some other point in time, schedule them in the future log (either in a specific month or in a blank future log page).


 

Design Ideas for your Bullet Journal Collections

 

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Cross-Stitching

Cross-Stitching

If you have no idea what cross stitching is, it’s a type of needlework that uses small x-shaped stitches to create intricate works of art. It has been around for ages, and it is one of the easiest forms of hand embroidery to learn.

Want to try it but don’t know where to start from? This article is here to help you.

Materials you need for cross stitch

If you are new to cross stitch you might wonder what are the best supplies for cross stitch. Below is a list of the essential things you need to cross stitch:

  • Cross Stitch Fabric (most projects are made on Aida or Evenweave Linen fabric)
  • A Cross Stitch Pattern (you can check Pinterest for ideas)
  • An Embroidery Needle (the size will depend on the fabric, but 24 should be OK)
  • Embroidery Floss (after you select the pattern you want to copy, you can check the color codes that you will need to use for that project)
  • Embroidery Hoop (this is optional, but the hoop helps to keep the fabric stretched and you finish stitching you will have your work directly framed in the hoop)

Beginners Tips

First important tip is: start in the middle of your fabric! It’s easier and this way you make sure you have plenty of room for your work. You can quickly find the center by folding your fabric two times double.

Then thread your needle just as you would a needle for hand sewing. Don’t make a knot in the tail end. You will stitch over the tail as you work to secure it without needing a knot. Another important thing is to aim for an even tension on your stitches. Don’t pull too hard as they will warp the fabric, and don’t leave them to loose so they will look sloppy.

One annoying thing about cross stitching is that the embroidery floss tends to get twisted as you stitch. Every once in a while, let your needle hang freely to let the thread unwind.

Also very important: do not forget the backside of your project. Don’t make it look too messy just because no one is going to look at it. Avoid making long jumps because they might show through the openings on the front. When you have to skip more then 4 blank pixels, I recommend that you secure your floss and start with a new thread.

And finally, be consistent in your stitching. The first line of your cross should always be leaning in the same way. It doesn’t matter if you start your cross stitch going ‘////’ or ‘\\\\’ as long as you are consistent with this pattern over the entirety of your project.

How to make a basic cross stitch

Our golden tip for making perfect cross stitches is to start making all the first legs of your cross stitches as per your cross stitch pattern.

After that you can easily stitch the second leg without having to look at your pattern.

Cross stitching projects for beginners

Years ago, I found this cute Garfield pattern online and decided to give it a try. This was my first cross stitching project and it came out really nice. I bought the materials I needed and just went for it! I found out that cross stitching is actually quite relaxing.

Then, years later, as a gift to my boyfriend, I decided to do a cute little panda (as his nickname used to be ‘Panda’).

For this one I bought a kit with all the materials included. I didn’t have time to finish the background of this one, as I had to give this on a specific date, but I think it still looks cute anyways!

Over time cross stitch hasn’t really had the recognition it deserves. It is actually quite fun, relaxing and a bit of a secret talent to have. There is no such as getting bored when you can take your little cross stitch kit with you wherever you go.

Fear not, because all though a finished cross stitch project looks super fancy and detailed, it is actually really easy to pick up. Give it a try and be surprised!

 

Journaling

Journaling

I believe writing can be one of the best ways to deepen our self-awareness and gain clarity about various aspects of our lives. One of my goals for this year is to try journaling every day.

So I prepared this journaling challenge for you. It’s a 21-day challenge so you can really implement this as a new habit, with 21 questions for self-reflection through writing.

Some of the benefits of maintaining a journaling practice are:

  • Find clarity about your thoughts and feelings: Do you often feel confused inside without being able to be sure what you want or are feeling? Writing down what you are thinking and feeling for just a few minutes helps bring clarity to all of this;
  • Knowing Yourself Better: By writing regularly, you are able to identify patterns in your thoughts, understand what causes each of your emotions, and resolve issues that you may have difficulty dealing with;
  • Reduce Stress: Writing about negative emotions such as anger, sadness, disillusionment or shame helps to shed weight and reduce the intensity of those emotions. In addition, we often provoke stress reactions in ourselves because we have a constant and endless loop of thoughts that recur inside our head. The act of writing helps to break this cycle, almost spewing some thoughts from within us to paper;
  • Finding solutions to problems or conflicts: Writing lets you put your thoughts in order and helps you make much clearer connections between different concepts. In addition, problem solving is often found creatively and not just analytically, and writing is a creative activity, you are getting in touch with that part of your brain, helping creative ideas to emerge.

 

Week 1

Day 1

What’s more important in my life?

Day 2

My favorite way to spend the day is…

Day 3

What has surprised me most about my life, or about life in general?

Day 4

Today I make a list of all questions I need an answer for urgently

Day 5

How should I live, knowing I will die?

Day 6

When was the last time I left my comfort zone?

Day 7

Today I make a list of all the things that inspire me: people, books, music, art, quotes, websites, etc.


Week 2

Day 8

What worries me about the future?

Day 9

I feel happy and good on my skin when…

Day 10

What were my biggest mistakes so far and what can I learn about them?

Day 11

How much has my life been under my control so far?

Day 12

Is what others think of me really important?

Day 13

What do I want from life?

Day 14

Which is worse: failing or never trying?


Week 3

Day 15

What topics do I need to learn more about in order to achieve a fuller, more fulfilling life? (Hint: Put time on the calendar to do it!)

Day 16

How do I care about what matters most in my life?

Day 17

What am I abdicating?

Day 18

How would I like others to remember me at the end of my life?

Day 19

If I could talk to my “me” 10 years ago, what would be the most important thing I would have to say?

Day 20

What would you do differently if I loved myself unconditionally?

Day 21

Today I write the words I need to hear myself

 

End of Week 3 Challenge: Do a personal SWOT analysis

Indoor Plants

plants

You don’t have to tend a garden outside to show off your green thumb. There are many beautiful plants which thrive indoors and provide cleaner air while adding a touch of natural color to your home. Find the top picks for beginners!

You don’t have to tend a garden outside to show off your green thumb. There are many beautiful plants which thrive indoors and provide cleaner air while adding a touch of natural color to your home. Whether you are an apartment dweller, a condo owner, or just want to bring a touch of the outdoors in, you’ll be able to choose from plenty of options to find the perfect pick for your personality, style, and experience level.

Some require more light and love, while others are adaptable to a variety of low light and dry conditions. Many plants also filter common contaminants from the air, while releasing extra oxygen for you to breathe. Whether you are looking for hanging foliage, tall plants, or simple succulents, here are the best indoor plants to make your space greener and more lively!

 

Best Indoor Plants for Beginners

 

Chamaedorea

chamaedorea

This plant gained a near-instant following for several good reasons. It’s adapted to relatively low light, can handle lower temperatures, and grows in attractive clumps with light-textured foliage cloaking thin trunks. These factors make the parlor palm one of the most popular indoor palms grown in most temperate countries.

Water: 7 – 14 days

 

Dragon Tree

Dragon Tree

Dragon tree is an attractive, stiff-leaved plant with green sword-like leaves edged with red. In the spring on the outdoor varieties, fragrant tiny white flowers bloom and are followed by circular yellow-orange berries, but on indoor plants, flowers and berries rarely appear. These plants are perfect for a beginner gardener because they’re very easy to grow indoors. Unlike many indoor trees, it tolerates a wide range of temperatures. Dragon trees are tough, drought-tolerant plants with aggressive root systems that make excellent houseplants.

Water: 5 – 7 days

 

Japanese Sago Palm

japanese sago palm

If the Cycas revoluta is your first introduction to the world of indoor palms, you’re in for a treat. Stiff fronds grow in an upright habit from a short, shaggy trunk that resembles a pineapple. This palm is slow-growing and shines when given a site with strong light. Water your sago palm sparingly to avoid problems with crown rot. If you’ve grown your sago palm successfully for years only to experience sudden plant loss, don’t feel bad: the plant has a natural lifespan of about 15 years.

Water: 14 – 21 days

 

Spider Plant

Spider Plant

Despite the creepy-crawly name, the spider plant is among the most popular (and easiest to grow) of all hanging or trailing houseplants. While these exceptionally hardy plants will survive in less than perfect conditions, in perfect conditions they are stunning. A mature plant will form tight rosettes of arching leaves with a profusion of hanging plantlets on long stems, up to three feet, somewhat like a bushy green mane.

Water: 5 – 10 days

 

Weeping Fig Tree

Weeping Fig Tree

Weeping fig grows as a large broadleaf evergreen tree in tropical and subtropical climates, but it is more often grown as a houseplant in homes, offices, and is a popular feature in interior commercial landscaping. It is a rare tree that has a good tolerance for the limited light conditions of indoor environments. Weeping fig is one of the best plants for improving air quality indoors. It has one of the top removal rates for air toxins such as formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene.

Water: 7 – 14 days

 

Philodendron

Heart-Leaf Philodendron

The Philodendron genus contains some of the most beautiful foliage plants in the plant kingdom. Their glossy leaves add a touch of indoor jungle to your home, reminiscent of the tropical areas of the Americas to which they are native. For indoor use, there are two basic types of philodendrons: the climbing varieties and the self-heading (non-climbing) types. The climbing varieties are often used in hanging baskets or trained along a trellis. The non-climbing ones provide excellent upright foliage plants in pots on the floor or table. Often they are valued for their ability to clean the air in your home.

Water: 5 – 10 days

 

English Ivy

Devil's Ivy

English ivy is a very vigorous and aggressive woody evergreen vine. Outdoors, English ivy is used as an ornamental ground-cover or elegant green covering for stone or brick walls. This is the plant that gave Ivy League colleges their name. English ivy is also a very popular indoor houseplant for hanging baskets. English ivy is frequently used as a dense ground-cover in places where turfgrass and other ground-covers do not readily grow. It is also used as an ornamental climbing cover for fences, stone walls, and brick facades.

Water: 7 – 10 days

 

Chinese Evergreen

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For a home that doesn’t receive a lot of natural light, the selection of indoor house plants that will thrive is more limited—but there are still some great choices, mainly this Chinese Evergreen. This plant has variegated green leaves and will produce white blooms and occasionally red berries, which is relatively unique for an indoor plant with low light needs. It does require some humidity, so you may need to mist the plant with a little water if your environment is dry. Note that the plant arrives in a ‘grower pot’ that you will most likely want to replace at some point, but wait until the plant has adjusted to its new environment in your home. The Chinese Evergreen does contain calcium oxalate, so it is poisonous if ingested.

Water: 7 – 9 days

 

Dieffenbachia

Dieffenbachia

Dieffenbachias​ features pointed, broad leaves in a variety of combinations of green and white. A large, well-grown dieffenbachia can reach five feet, with leaves of a foot or more. However, the plants will rarely reach this size in typical indoor conditions. The name of dumb cane comes from the dieffenbachia’s milky sap, which is a mild irritant and should be kept from bare skin. The sap can cause temporary loss of speech. Consider avoiding dieffenbachias if you have small children or pets around the house.

Water: 7 – 9 days

 

Snake Plant

snake plant

Snake Plant is one of the most popular and hardy species of houseplants. An architectural species, it features stiff leaves that range from six inches to eight feet tall, depending on the variety. Sansevieria was first cultivated in China and kept as a treasured houseplant because it was believed the eight gods bestowed their virtues (long life, prosperity, intelligence, beauty, art, poetry, health, and strength) upon those who grew the snake plant. Sansevieria also is among several plants chosen by NASA for a study on how plants can be used for air purification and to combat “sick building syndrome.”

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Aloe Vera

aloe vera

Aloe vera is commonly grown as a houseplant and gained favor because the gel from its leaves makes a soothing skin salve, although some people are actually irritated by the gel. There are over 300 species of Aloe vera, but the one most commonly grown as a houseplant is Aloe barbadensis. It has thick, succulent leaves that are plumped up with a watery gel. The leaves grow from the base of the plant, in a rosette, and have jagged edges with flexible spines. Young plants don’t generally flower and aloe grown as a houseplant can take years to produce a flower stalk.

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Bamboo Palm

bamboo palm

Also known as the bamboo palm, the areca palm Dypsis lutescens is popular because of its soft fronds and tolerance of low light. The areca palm prefers a moderate amount of water, although it does tolerate occasional drought. However, they need fairly bright light and they are especially sensitive to the buildup of fertilizer salts. But if you are looking for a good short-lived palm for indoor growth, the areca palm is a popular and relatively inexpensive option.

Water: 5 – 10 days

 

Boston Fern

boston fern

The Boston fern is one of the most well-known ferns and admired for its desirable traits as a houseplant. Boston ferns are typically attractive, with long, graceful fronds bedecked with tiny leaves. It is a relatively tough fern, with a higher tolerance for light than other species, and as far as ferns go, they are more tolerant of dry conditions and easy to propagate. An added bonus is that Boston ferns can be displayed in any number of ways, including on pedestals, in hanging baskets, as part of a grouping, or as lush specimen plants on the right windowsill.

Water: 1 – 3 days

 

Echeveria Succulents

echeveria

Echeverias are one of the most popular types of succulents and are frequently featured in succulent gardens, floral arrangements, terrariums, artwork, and even wedding cakes. Their stunning rosette shape, plump leaves, and large variety of colors give them a striking resemblance to flowers which makes them easy to decorate with. Their unique appearance and low maintenance needs have made Echeverias widely popular. Watering is the most important aspect of proper Echeveria careEcheverias, like most succulents, do not require much water. It is better to under-water Echeverias than to overwater them, as they can quickly succumb to root rot if overwatered.

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Lucky Bamboo

lucky bamboo

You don’t have to look very hard to find lucky bamboo nowadays. These plants pop up in offices, on desks, in businesses, and in homes pretty much everywhere. An important part of feng shui, lucky bamboo plants are said to bring good luck and fortune, especially if the plants were given as gifts. It also helps that they have a well-earned reputation as nearly indestructible; these tough stalks can survive in vases of pure water or in containers of soil, and in a wide variety of light conditions. Even a poorly kept lucky bamboo plant will live for a long time before it finally succumbs.

Water: 7 – 10 days

 

ZZ Plant

zz plant

Looking for a low-maintenance houseplant to spruce up your space without a big commitment? Look no further than the infamous ZZ plant, also known as the zanzibar gem! Characterized by their shiny, oval-shaped deep green leaves, ZZ plants make excellent additions to any home or office. ZZ plants are tolerant of a wide range of lighting conditions which makes them well-suited to indoor growing. ZZ plants are extremely drought-tolerant and can handle infrequent watering. In general, ZZ plants should be watered once the soil dries out completely—usually once every week or two depending on their growing conditions.

Water: 7 – 14 days

 

Ficus Ginseng (Bonsai Tree)

ficus ginseng

A bonsai tree can create excellent feng shui energy/associations. Bonsai tree plants can be fascinating because you are basically looking at a whole tree in a miniature version. Bonsai come in all shapes and sizes, from one upright tree to a small forest of mostly horizontal shape trees. Many trees and shrubs are trained to grow in a miniature form, from California redwood to cypress and juniper. At their best, the bonsai trees are a beautiful work of art that requires patience and sensibility; at their worst, they can be an eyesore and a source of pain if neglected.

Water: 15 – 21 days

 

Pachira Aquatica (Money Tree)

pachira aquatica

The Money Tree is a species of tree native to Central and South America that has become an attractive houseplant thanks to its hardy nature. First popularized as a houseplant in Taiwan in the 1980s, the Money Tree is prominent among those who practice Feng Shui and is believed to create positive “Chi,” or energy in the home. This has made it a staple in offices, banks, and homes alike. Guiana Chestnut is most commonly sold as a small plant with a braided trunk made up of three, five, or seven stems. The trees are braided by nurseries when they are young and will continue to grow this way as they mature

Water: 10 – 15 days

 

Cactus

cactus

All cactus plants are members of the Cactaceae family, and there are thousands of species of cactus. There are two large groups of cacti grown as houseplants; both are popular and familiar, and both can thrive indoors with relatively little maintenance. The desert cacti are the more “traditional” cacti, usually covered with spines or hair and often growing in paddles, balls, or obelisks. Forest cacti grow in wooded areas, ranging from temperate forests to subtropical and tropical regions. The most well-known forest cacti may be the Christmas cactus. Both desert and forest cacti boast beautiful blooms, but they have very different growing habits.

Water: 15 – 21 days

 

Peace Lily

Peace lily

The peace lily is a tropical species that is a favorite flowering houseplant. The peace lily blooms in spring with long-lasting flowers that hover gracefully over the leaves on the stalks. A well-grown peace lily may bloom twice a year, resulting in several months of flowers. Peace lilies filter more indoor pollutants than most other plants, so are great for bedrooms or other frequented rooms. Inside the tropical plant’s pores, toxic gases like carbon monoxide and formaldehyde are broken down and neutralized.

Water: 5 – 10 days

Macramé

Macrame

Macramé may be the millennial DIY of the moment, but it dates back centuries! It is a form of textile art produced using knotting (rather than weaving or knitting) techniques that have been around from as early as the 13th century.

The primary knot of macramé is the square knot. However, many forms of knots can be used in different combinations to form different designs.

Types of knots
Different types of knots

The materials used in macramé are typically the 3-ply cotton rope, made of three lengths of fiber twisted together. You will also need a wooden stick and scissors:

Macrame materials

There are many amazing things you can do to decorate your house – from wall hangings, to plant hangers, shelves, swings… you name it! You can see some examples below:

Want to give it a try? Here are the instructions to do a Macramé Wall Hanging for beginners. For this macramé wall hanging you should use 4 mm cotton cord.

Macramé Wall Hanging for Beginners

  1. To determine the length of the cords to cut, measure 8 times the length you would like your project to be.
  2. Measure and cut 12 strands.
  3. Begin by tying a separate strand at each end of the wooden dowel.  Secure to a heavy object or hang.
  4. To attach each cord to the dowel, you’ll be using the Lark’s head knot.  Fold cord in half and wrap folded center  loop across dowel. Pull ends up through loop.

5.  Attach all cords to dowel using the lark’s head knot.

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6.  Using 2 of the lark’s head knots (4 strands), make a square knot.

7.  Repeat square knots across dowel.

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8.  In the second row, make square knots with two strands of each previous row square knot.

9.  Continue the row across dowel.

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10.  Repeat first two rows until desired length.

11.  Fray or unravel cord at ends before hanging or leave as is.

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You can see below some of the things I did so far. If you don’t feel like doing a wall hanging, you can do a cute key chain like the one I made, following the same steps. Check Pinterest for more inspiration.

Key chain

Easy right? Once you get used to it you can try more complex knots. If you are looking for a new hobby and you love DIYing your home decor, macramé can be perfect for you!